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In Darkest England and the Way Out, by William Booth

William Booth

On this day in history,

in 1890, “In Darkest England and the Way Out”, a classic work of social programming by Salvation Army Founder, William Booth, was first published.

This controversial book presented Booth‘s plans for a program to help the poor and needy. His ideas were summarized in what he termed ‘The Cab-Horse Charter’ which read,

“When a horse is down he is helped up, and while he lives he has food, shelter and work. That, although a humble standard, is at present absolutely unattainable by millions – literally by millions – of our fellow men and women.”

“In Darkest England and the Way Out”

In Darkest England and the Way Out by William Booth Cover

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On This Day In History, June 24: William Booth Received by King Edward VII

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In 1904, William Booth, founder of The Salvation Army, was received by King Edward VII of Great Britain, the first official recognition by a world leader of the importance of the then–39–year–old movement. When The King asked the General what his recreations were and to sign his autograph album, he wrote: “Some men’s ambition is art. Some men’s ambition is fame. Some men’s ambition is gold. My ambition is the souls of men.”

Booth, while both humbled and honored by the king’s acknowledgement, was true to his convictions. He told the sovereign of the ongoing work of the Army in 49 countries. The visit was to make an impact upon the Army and its place in the world, but also on the monarch.
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William Booth

William Booth Makes His Last Public Appearance: On This Day In History, May 9

William Booth Makes His Last Public Appearance

William Booth makes his last public appearance at Royal Albert Hall in London in 1912. The 83 year old founder of The Salvation Army, in front of a crowd of 7,000, gave his farewell sermon closing with these words:
“While women weep as they do now, I’ll fight;
while little children go hungry as they do now, I’ll fight;
while men go to prison, in and out, in and out, as they do now, I’ll fight;
while there is a drunkard left, while there is a poor lost girl on the streets, while there remains one dark soul without the light of God, I’ll fight—I’ll fight to the very end.”

William Booth makes his last public appearance

William Booth began The Salvation Army in July 1865. Preaching to a small congregation in the slums of London, his spirit was as militant as that of a professional soldier while battling an almost overwhelming army. Thieves, prostitutes, gamblers, and drunkards were among Booth’s first converts to Christianity. His congregation were desperately poor. He preached hope and salvation. His aim was to lead them to Christ and link them to a church for continued spiritual guidance.

Read more about William Booth, The Salvation Army’s founder, here.