The Salvation Army of St. Petersburg Responds Following Tornadoes in Pinellas County

St. Petersburg, FL – The Salvation of St. Petersburg is providing assistance to residents affected by the March 31 storms.

The Salvation Army is providing meals to residents who are without power following the devastating tornadoes that touched-down in Pinellas County around 11:30 Thursday morning.

Late Thursday morning, a storm blew through Pinellas County bringing wind and rain and knocked down power lines, uprooted trees and overturned some small aircraft at the St. Petersburg – Clearwater International Airport.

Included in the destruction of the storm was Four Seasons Estates, 13225 101st Street SE, Largo, Fla. This community lost power and reported nearly a dozen homes that suffered damage to roofs and windows.

The Salvation Army St. Petersburg canteen (mobile kitchen) was deployed to the Four Seasons Estates where a Salvation Army staff member and volunteer provided meals to residents. The Salvation Army planned to provide meals Friday morning, if necessary.

Salvation Army offices in Winter Haven and Tampa are on stand-by ready to assist if needed.

Media Contacts:

Michael Rojas
Public Relations Director
The Salvation Army of St. Petersburg 

(813) 857-0297

Michael_Rojas@uss.salvationarmy.org

Dulcinea Cuellar
Public Relations Director
The Salvation Army of Florida
(813) 376-0836
Dulcinea_Cuellar@uss.salvationarmy.org

The Salvation Army in Japan Considers Long-term Response to Earthquake

Japan – Salvation Army emergency workers in Japan report that the government disaster response is proceeding well and that most areas in need of assistance have now been reached. Salvation Army teams continue to provide vital supplies such as food and water in Sendai and also in Yabuki-cho, both of which are near Fukushima but outside the exclusion zone set up around the nuclear power plant. Yabuki-cho appears to be one of the few areas not yet reached by government help.

Some areas hit particularly badly by the disaster are still not accessible but Salvation Army workers understand that other non-governmental organizations are also not being allowed into these parts. The exclusion zone around the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant remains in place and local reports suggest the situation is improving.

As previously reported, bottled water has been provided to The Salvation Army’s Japan Territory from Korea. The Salvation Army World Services Organization (SAWSO) in the USA is organizing a delivery of blankets and has arranged for samples of food packages to be sent to territorial leaders who will then have the option to order any if needed.

There has been a considerable financial response to The Salvation Army’s Japan Disaster Appeal from around the world. The Japan Territory believes funds already available in-country will cover the costs of the current response and that money raised from around the world will enable a medium to long-term response. The territory is considering building temporary accommodation and providing household goods and equipment but these plans are still at the early stages.

Commissioner Makoto Yoshida, The Salvation Army’s Territorial Commander in Japan, is grateful for the practical and spiritual support that has been offered from across the world.

He reports that commuters in Tokyo who were given food, drink and shelter at territorial headquarters on the night of the earthquake have sent letters of thanks, some including a donation for the relief work.

There are four ways people can contribute money to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts in Japan:

  • Text the words “JAPAN” or “QUAKE” to 80888 to make a $10 donation.
  • By phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY
  • On-line at: https://donate.salvationarmyusa.org
  • By mail: Send your check, marked “Japan earthquake relief” to

The Salvation Army World Service Office
International Relief Fund
PO Box 630728
Baltimore, MD 21263-0728

  • Monetary donations are the most critical need as supplies and personnel are mobilized.
  • These funds offer the greatest flexibility and enable local disaster responders to purchase exactly what is needed as close to the disaster zone as possible.
  • At this time, The Salvation Army is not accepting donations of goods or household items (gifts-in-kind) from the general public for disaster relief operations in Japan.
  • The Salvation Army is extremely grateful for the generosity that has already poured in to help us meet both immediate and long-term needs.

Families Affected By Drought In Kenya Given Food

In the district of Makueni, east Kenya, the rains failed in October, November, and December 2010. The resultant drought and crop failures have left 2.6 million people in need of food aid. Following consultation with the Government Agriculture Office, The Salvation Army was asked to provide food to 388 families in an area that the government was struggling to assist. A Salvation Army team distributed a two week ration of maize, beans, and cooking oil to relieve distress at this difficult time. The most appropriate beneficiaries were chosen after discussions with community leaders and staff from local non-governmental organizations.

Donations to the Africa Disaster Fund can be made by clicking the following link: https://secure.salvationarmy.org/

Salvation Army Earthquake Response in Japan Has to Overcome Weather and Fuel Issues

Japan – The Salvation Army’s earthquake response in Japan is continuing its work despite difficulties caused by snow and the lack of fuel. A team that was set to head from Tokyo to the tsunami-hit north of the country had to delay its journey because of snow but has now made its way to Sendai, where a distribution will take place tomorrow morning (Saturday).

The three teams that carried out distributions in Sendai, Koriyama, Shirakawa, Fukushima and Mito City on Wednesday 16 March returned to The Salvation Army’s Japan Territorial Headquarters in Tokyo [pictured below] to report on what they had seen and decide what should be done next. International Emergency Services worker Major Raelton Gibbs reports: ‘The work that has been done is commendable – from feeding programs out of Salvation Army halls to the distribution of blankets, water bottles, bread and nappies (diapers).’

He says that Tokyo continues to feel aftershocks and admits that ‘no matter how many you experience they are all a little daunting’.

The Salvation Army distribution teams are well aware of the concerns surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station and are staying clear of the exclusion zones.

Major Gibbs says he has been impressed by the response put together by The Salvation Army’s Japan Territory. The fuel and weather problems mean that people have had to be flexible. He tells of one group that tried to get to Sendai but was unable to make it all the way and so met the needs of some smaller communities around Koriyama on the way back to Tokyo.

The focus is understandably on the immediate response but Major Gibbs says that longer-term plans are being put in place, such as the provision of cooking equipment when people return to their communities. As it often does in emergency responses, The Salvation Army will pay particular attention to communities that have been missed by the government and other agencies.

Photos of The Salvation Army’s response in Japan can be found on the International Headquarters Flickr site: click here to access.

There are four ways people can contribute money to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts in Japan:

  • Text the words “JAPAN” or “QUAKE” to 80888 to make a $10 donation.
  • By phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY
  • On-line at: https://donate.salvationarmyusa.org
  • By mail: Send your check, marked “Japan earthquake relief” to

The Salvation Army World Service Office
International Relief Fund
PO Box 630728
Baltimore, MD 21263-0728

 

  • Monetary donations are the most critical need as supplies and personnel are mobilized.
  • These funds offer the greatest flexibility and enable local disaster responders to purchase exactly what is needed as close to the disaster zone as possible.
  • At this time, The Salvation Army is not accepting donations of goods or household items (gifts-in-kind) from the general public for disaster relief operations in Japan.

The Salvation Army is extremely grateful for the generosity that has already poured in to help us meet both immediate and long-term needs.

The Salvation Army Opens in Togo and Continues to Grow Around The World

IHQ, LondonFollowing consultation with the International Management Council (IMC), General Shaw Clifton has approved the official commencement of Salvation Army work in Togo, effective 1 April 2011. Togo – officially the Togolese Republic – is a country in West Africa, bordered by Ghana to the west, Benin to the east and Burkina Faso to the north. The fledgling work in Togo has been developing under supervision of the Ghana Territory and will continue to do so. With this new opening The Salvation Army is now at work officially in 124 countries.

Many messages reached International Headquarters between 1999 and 2005, both from residents of the country and Togolese people living in the USA and Canada, asking that Army work be commenced in Togo. In March 2007 the Ghana Territory dispatched a fact-finding team to Togo, which was greeted with great enthusiasm by established churches and community leaders alike. It was discovered that Salvation Army meetings were already being held and converts were being made. Seven societies have been opened during the past year, 230 seekers have been registered and 14 indigenous soldiers have been enrolled. Work among children and young people is also developing well.

Captains Hervé Michel and Naty Dorcas Ahouyanganga, of the Congo (Brazzaville) Territory, have been appointed to give leadership to this new work as of 1 April 2011.

Middle East Region

There are also developments concerning Salvation Army work in the Middle East. The Salvation Army was officially established in Kuwait in 2008 and in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2010. The Army received excellent support and cooperation from St Andrew’s Church in Dubai in the early days of exploration leading to the start of its work in Kuwait.

Three centers now operate – Abu Dhabi and Sharjah (both in the UAE) and Kuwait. In recent days regular Army meetings have also been taking place in Bahrain and Oman, though these activities remain on an informal basis for the time being and are not yet officially established as Salvation Army activity.

In view of the development that has taken place in the region in the past three years, and the obvious potential for further growth, the General has approved the proposal that the work in Kuwait and the United Arab Emirates shall be known, for Salvation Army purposes, as the Middle East Region as from 1 April 2011 (reporting directly to International Headquarters). Should the activities in Oman, Bahrain or other countries in that area move to official recognition, they will be included in the Middle East Region.

Majors Mike and Teresa Hawley, officers of the USA Southern Territory, will be the regional leaders – Major Mike Hawley serving as Regional Officer.

Updates on countries where Salvation Army work has opened since 2007

The General has received updated reports on Salvation Army work established during the past four years, briefly summarized as follows (dates in brackets indicate when work officially commenced):

Burundi (2007) – The work here is now part of the Rwanda and Burundi Command. Regular worship meetings are taking place, as are women’s and children’s activities. The first youth councils will take place in 2011. Burundi currently has 182 senior soldiers, 74 junior soldiers, 74 recruits and 319 adherent members.

Greece (2007) – The Salvation Army’s legal constitution in Greece has been recognized by the Greek authorities. Army ministry includes prison visitation, food distribution on soup runs, hospital visits and a ministry to trafficked women working in the red light district of Thessolonika. Regular Bible study takes place, as does an ‘open house’ event in the officers’ quarters. A newly commissioned Greek officer-couple (trained in London) will be appointed later in the year and it is hoped that their emphasis on corps work will give impetus to the development of a spiritual ministry in Greece. The work is part of the the Italy and Greece Command.

Namibia (2008) – Steady growth continues, with a number of senior and junior soldiers enrolled in 2010. Local officers have been commissioned. Namibia is under the direction of the Southern Africa Territory. Successful outreach activities took place during the 2010 FIFA Soccer World Cup which was held in South Africa, attracting new families into the orbit of Salvation Army activity. Namibia currently has 54 senior soldiers, 42 junior soldiers and seven local officers.

Mali (2008) – Two new corps and two new societies have been established in the past year. Officers have been appointed from the Congo (Brazzaville) Territory to support the regional leaders and to run Sogoniko Corps. Mali has 54 senior soldiers, 27 junior soldiers, 34 recruits and 19 adherent members, as well as a growing number of people involved in singers’ groups, timbrels, home league, junior home league and other groups. The Mali Region reports to International Headquarters.

Mongolia (2008) – Great encouragement has come from the good beginnings the Army’s ministry has had in Mongolia, moving along under the careful supervision of the Korea Territory and led by a Korean officer-couple, Captain Lee, Min-ho and Captain Chang, Mi-hyun. A number of education programs are running, involving 150 students on a daily basis. Other community programs address diverse needs among the people. Work continues with regard to finalizing the legal registration of The Salvation Army in Mongolia, with the hope that the government will recognize the Army as a religious body, thus enabling it to have maximum impact in the country.

Nepal (2009) – The Army now has two centers of worship in Nepal – one in Kathmandu, with 12 soldiers and five adherent members, and the other in Goldhap, Jhapa District, with 25 soldiers and seven adherent members. Plans are in place for the opening of an outpost in Doramba, Ramechap District, where there are already 10 soldiers. A regular holiness meeting takes place each Saturday (Sunday is a normal working day in Nepal) and cottage prayer meetings take place during the week. A community training centre has been established, providing training in tailoring, crafts and the English language. Each class begins with a 15-minute devotional. These combined skills help Nepalese women to find employment and thus become self-sufficient. Nepal’s work is under the direction of the India Eastern Territory.

Sierra Leone (2010) – The Army has been able to make use of radio and television opportunities as part of its evangelical outreach and the first outpost has been opened. Training sessions for local officers are taking place. Between May 2010 and February this year 68 senior soldiers were enrolled and a further 15 recruits are currently in preparation for soldiership. Sixteen newly trained local officers are preparing to take up their responsibilities. The Liberia Command supervises the work in Sierra Leone.

Nicaragua (2010) – A change of leadership has recently taken place for The Salvation Army in Nicaragua (part of the Latin America North Territory). There is every indication that steady growth can be anticipated. Four home cell groups are operating. More than 100 seekers have been registered and preparations are in place for the enrollment of eight senior soldiers and 12 junior soldiers.

Turks & Caicos Islands (2011) – A strong social emphasis formed the basis of early Salvation Army efforts on the Turks & Caicos Islands – including a school lunch program, senior transport program and family thrift store. These established a positive image for the Army in the community upon which an effective spiritual ministry is now being built. Around 60 people regularly attend the weekly Sunday worship meeting. School and door-to-door visitation are bringing the Army into contact with an increasing number of people. The Turks & Caicos Islands are part of the Caribbean Territory.

Solomon Islands (2011) – Though officially established only as recently as 1 February this year, Salvation Army work on the Solomon Islands shows great promise. Operating under supervision from the Papua New Guinea Territory, worship meetings involve a regular congregation of 60 people. Up to 30 people are participating in recruits’ classes and local officers have been commissioned. Two soldiers have applied for officer training and anticipate entering the Army’s training college in Papua New Guinea in January 2012. Various community needs present opportunities for The Salvation Army to become involved in a practical Christian ministry in the islands.

The General calls Salvationists and friends throughout the world to continue in prayer for God’s blessing upon these burgeoning expressions of Army ministry in so many different parts of the world.

The Salvation Army Warns of Bogus Email Appeal For Japan Relief Donations

Atlanta, GA – The Salvation Army is warning donors to beware of a bogus email appeal which asks for donations to The Salvation Army’s Relief efforts in Japan (SEE ATTACHED EMAIL AT BOTTOM). The appeal, claiming to be from “Salvation Army National Corp.,” urges donors to send a donation to an email address which IS NOT a valid Salvation Army address. The scam uses actual language such as The Salvation Army Mission Statement, history, and programs, which has obviously been taken from legitimate Salvation Army sites. It even lists The Salvation Army’s International web address, all in an attempt to trick donors into believing that the email is legitimate. Those interested in The Salvation Army’s relief efforts are encouraged to visit The Salvation Army USA’s national website at www.salvationarmyusa.org.

There are four ways people can contribute money to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts in Japan:

• Text the words “JAPAN” or “QUAKE” to 80888 to make a $10 donation.

• By phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY

• On-line at: https://donate.salvationarmyusa.org

• By mail: Send your check, marked “Japan earthquake relief” to

The Salvation Army World Service Office

International Relief Fund

PO Box 630728

Baltimore, MD 21263-0728

• Monetary donations are the most critical need as supplies and personnel are mobilized.

• These funds offer the greatest flexibility and enable local disaster responders to purchase exactly what is needed as close to the disaster zone as possible.

• At this time, The Salvation Army is not accepting donations of goods or household items (gifts-in-kind) from the general public for disaster relief operations in Japan.

• The Salvation Army is extremely grateful for the generosity that has already poured in to help us meet both immediate and long-term needs.

WARNING: THE FOLLOWING EMAIL IS A SCAM

From: Salvation Army National Corp. [mailto:donate-to-japan.earthquake@salvationarmy.co.uk]

Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2011 7:57 PM

Subject: Japan earthquake and Tsunami: How to help/Salvation Army?

Salvation Army National Corp.

Alton, Hampshire, GU34

United Kingdom
donations@salvationarmyrelief.zzn.com

Mission and Programs

The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in His name without discrimination.

Programs

A 127-year old, faith-based charity, The Salvation Army helps people with all kinds of needs in virtually every community across America. Some of these activities include operating Adult Rehabilitation Centers, running programs for children and seniors and providing emergency disaster services support.

Additional Comments from the Organization

According to management expert Peter Drucker, The Salvation Army is “by far the most effective organization in the U.S.” A responsible steward of the generosity of the American people, at least 83 cents of every dollar donated to The Salvation Army goes directly to assist those in need.

Donate

We humbly want to bring to your notice and call for your immense support to massive 8.9/9.0 magnitude earthquake hit the Pacific Ocean nearby Northeastern Japan at around 2:46pm on March 11 (JST) causing damage with blackouts, fire and tsunami.
Salvation Army National Corp have been working hard to see how to raise help to these pandemics situation.

We humbly hope for your support and strongly believe you can save a life.

Add to Japan earthquake and Tsunami

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* To donate: Contact us by email using: donations@salvationarmyrelief.zzn.com
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Alton, Hampshire, GU34

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Worldwide Support Helps Salvation Army Emergency Response in Japan

Japan – Three Salvation Army teams in Japan are providing vital assistance to people affected by the country’s earthquake, the resulting tsunami and ongoing problems at a nuclear power station. The Japanese Government has recognized the Army’s work and given its teams permission to enter the disaster area and use access roads that are closed off to the public.

The first of the three teams went to Sendai, where about 1,000 meals were served to evacuees. Hot meals and drinks were prepared in The Salvation Army’s mobile emergency canteen and given out at Sendai Corps (Salvation Army church). Handy towels and Salvation Army publications were also distributed.

Another team went to a relief office in the Mito area and unloaded bottles of water, biscuits, blankets, nappies (diapers) and tissue boxes for distribution to evacuees.

The third team headed to an area where people had been evacuated from the vicinity around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, but snow and shortage of gasoline meant they had to divert to other areas to support evacuees.

Offers of support are pouring in from around the world. Two experienced International Emergency Services workers have flown to Tokyo from International Headquarters in London to assist their Japanese colleagues. The BBC reports that volunteers from a British group which failed to obtain clearance to work in the affected areas ‘donated their food and medical supplies to The Salvation Army working in the country’.

The Salvation Army’s Korea Territory has arranged for the K-Water Corporation to provide 100,000 bottles of water to be sent to Japan – 30,000 bottles by the end of the week, followed by the rest within a short time – and the Korea Disaster Relief Association will be sending 5,000 first-aid kits. Salvationists in Korea are holding a month of prayer for the people of Japan.

In a touching show of solidarity 1,500 young Salvationists in Haiti – who themselves have recent experience of a devastating earthquake – made prayer for Japan a focus of their rally in Fond-des-Nègres on 11-12 March.



A Letter from Japan American Salvation Army Officer Describes Life in Tokyo

Captain Christopher Marques is a young Salvation Army Officer (minister) who is from Decatur, Illinois, but is currently stationed at The Salvation ArmyÕs Headquarters for Japan. His normal work is with the young people in Japan. Following are some excerpts from a message we received from him early on Wednesday Morning, March 16.

…Thank you for your prayers. They are perhaps the greatest gift we can use right about now. As you know, the country is still being shaken by aftershocks; even today we just felt a larger one after lunch. But so far they have not been near the level we saw on Friday I am starting to get used to the ground shaking a little bit on and off, but still am surprised by some of the frequent medium-sized incidents.

There is still a problem with the reactors that are critical and leaking in the Fukushima area (in-between Tokyo and the tsunami-hit area of Sendai). The immediate area surrounding the plant has, of course, been evacuated from a 30 kilometer radius.

For now, those near the affected area who have not been evacuated or staying in temporary shelters have been advised to stay indoors. In the rest of the country we aren’t moving much since gas/petrol is hard to find√âthe fuel lines are still stretching for blocks for anyone trying to get their car filled up.

The power supply is being cut in various areas to save the whole electrical system from crashing. With subways and trains running reduced schedules, and cars being used less- many are either using bicycles, walking or staying home.

The stores are struggling to keep shelves full and some things are simply impossible to findÑeven for us trying to get food for the relief victims. Today was not quite as crowded or busy in the grocery/convenience stores.

Most of us here have thankfully been able to go to work each day and help manage the relief effort from our Tokyo office.

My boss has left to help support the first relief teams that are further north. He has training and experience with disaster situations, so he was a natural choice along with the rest of the group. However, he is very close to the reactor area helping with victims and I pray for his safe return.

Today, during our daily morning devotions, we sang Count Your Blessings, and that song really came alive as we thanked God for our lives, His protection, our basic needs being met at this time and just having shelter, clothing and access to some kind of food each day.

We appreciate your continued prayer support for the people here during this difficult time. May God bless you all back home and keep you hearts firmly connected to Him.

God Bless You,

Chris

Source: Captain Christopher Marques, The Salvation Army Headquarters, Tokyo, Japan

The Salvation Army has had a presence in Japan since 1895 and is also mobilizing a significant international response to manage both immediate and long-term needs. Two experienced International Emergency Services workers have flown to Tokyo from International Headquarters in London to assist their Japanese colleagues. The Salvation Army’s Korea Territory has arranged for the K-Water Corporation to provide 100,000 bottles of water to be sent to Japan √ê 30,000 bottles by the end of the week, followed by the rest within a short time; the Korea Disaster Relief Association will also be sending 5,000 first-aid kits.

There are four ways people can contribute money to The Salvation Army’s disaster relief efforts in Japan:

Monetary donations are the most critical need as supplies and personnel are mobilized.
These funds offer the greatest flexibility and enable local disaster responders to purchase exactly what is needed as close to the disaster zone as possible.

• Text the words "JAPAN" or "QUAKE" to 80888 to make a $10 donation

• By phone: 1-800-SAL-ARMY

• On-line at: https://donate.salvationarmyusa.org

• By mail: Send your check, marked "Japan earthquake relief" to:

The Salvation Army World Service Office
International Relief Fund
PO Box 630728
Baltimore, MD 21263-0728

At this time, The Salvation Army is not accepting donations of goods or household items (gifts-in-kind) from the general public for disaster relief operations in Japan.

The Salvation Army is extremely grateful for the generosity that has already poured in to help us meet both immediate and long-term needs.

The Salvation Army in New Zealand Launches Fresh Earthquake Initiatives

Christchurch, New Zealand – As part of its continuing support for earthquake-hit residents in Christchurch, The Salvation Army in New Zealand is distributing 4,000 ‘Care Cards’, each loaded with NZ$500, to affected households. The project was developed in partnership with Westpac Bank.

The use of the Care Card is at the discretion of recipients, but can be put towards the cost of urgent house repairs or to purchase food, clothing or other goods, says Salvation Army Public Relations Secretary Major Robbie Ross. Cards are limited to one per household.

Payments and grants are available from a range of organizations but Salvation Army workers report high levels of earthquake-related unemployment and material hardship experienced by families as well as a substantial degree of anxiety about their futures.

Money for the Care Cards comes from The Salvation Army’s Canterbury Earthquake Appeal, which as at 14 March stood at $9.36 million ($5.25 million banked, the remainder in collections and pledges).

The Salvation Army has also released a ‘Take a Break’ scheme aimed at giving individuals and families suffering significant emotional stress a break away from the city. Help with travel, accommodation and costs will be provided to eligible people.

Major Ross says the need for the scheme has become increasingly evident over the past week. ‘While our people are seeing many examples of strong community spirit,’ he points out, ‘there is clear evidence that some residents in the hardest-hit suburbs are now nearing the end of their emotional endurance limits.’

The Salvation Army still has more than 100 care workers visiting the worst-affected suburbs to assess residents’ emotional and material needs, with other personnel following up more complex cases and teams of volunteers delivering food, water, clothing and bedding to those who need them. Another team of volunteers has been providing support to the families of those still listed as missing. The bulk of reinforcement staff – from around the country and Australia – are operating in Monday to Friday shifts, with a smaller staff on weekend duty.

The Salvation Army’s Linwood Centre is providing around 800 food parcels a day and other goods, as well as food, fuel and clothing vouchers.

Salvation Army community worker Brent Christoffersen was part of the second wave of reinforcement personnel deployed to Christchurch. He says:

‘I was really blasé about the Christchurch earthquake at first. I did care, but there was other stuff going on for me. Then our church (Hutt City Salvation Army Corps in Wellington) held an urgent prayer meeting. I went home from that, watched TV and said to a mate, “Let’s go, we have to do something!” I really wanted to get down there once I saw how bad it was.

‘Most people were just so pleased to see The Salvation Army. I explained that we were doing brief assessments to find out what people needed and that other people with us would check that their houses were safe to live in. Some people would say, “We’re fine,” but others said, “It’s so good to see you here – you’re the first people to come around.”

‘I took bottles of water to a guy in a wheelchair who couldn’t leave his house. I visited an old lady in her 70s, and there were blankets under her dining room table – that was where she was sleeping. Another old lady who was on oxygen was really scared in case her power stopped. I asked her neighbor to keep an eye on her. One lady said that every time a truck went by her house it was like another earthquake. Her nerves were shot.

‘The welfare of people’s heads and emotional state is going to be a key need now. A guy told me he’d seen a building with three workers on it, and when the earthquake happened, the building just exploded on them. They got out, but those memories are there for that guy and they won’t ever go away. I think The Salvation Army needs to keep on caring, especially with counseling and support.

‘We can’t neglect our people and our communities. We’re not the biggest country in the world, but we’ve got enough people to get down there and help.’

Donations to the Canterbury Earthquake Appeal can be made online by clicking here.

Japan Earthquake/Tsunami Update

We have heard from SAWSO (Salvation Army World Service Office) that The Salvation Army (USA) remains on stand-by until International Headquarters and the Japan Territory assess their needs in terms of a response. We have not received any specific updated information since the bulletin posted on Friday and the national blog http://blog.salvationarmyusa.org/?p=5635

As far as outreach with the media is concerned, it has been suggested by NHQ that we have been fairly successful getting the word out about the little we do know and how people can support our relief efforts (text to give, etc.)

To provide some sense of this effort, below is a key-word search from Google News for “”Relief Organization” and Japan”.

Results are as of 11:45 PM ET, March 13, 2011.

“Red Cross”: 3,884
“American Red Cross”: 770
“Save the Children”: 269
“Salvation Army”: 257
“Red Crescent”: 104
“World Vision”: 69
“International Medical Corps”: 65
“Shelterbox”: 49
“Oxfam”: 33
“Convoy of Hope”: 36
“Americares”: 27
“Doctors Without Borders”: 26
“Catholic Relief”: 20
“Mercy Corps”: 13
“Operation USA”: 9