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Prayer and Support Needed For Haiyan Survivors

Prayer and Support Needed for Haiyan Survivors

Prayer and Support Needed For Haiyan Survivors

 

In the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, a man walks through rubble in the city of Tacloban in Leyte province, one of the worst affected areas. The following was contributed by The Salvation Army Philippine Territory. Emergency Disaster Service teams have been providing essentials to those affected by the typhoon since the storm hit Friday, including food, shelter, water, and emotional and spiritual care.

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Prayer and Support Needed for Haiyan Survivors
Monetary donations are the most critical need for survivors. Click here to give, or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).

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The devastation caused by Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan) left more than 10,000 dead and thousands of homes flat. The nightmare seemed to have escalated in the Visayas Island with people still trying to recover from a recent magnitude 7.2 earthquake with Bohol as the epicentre. As of this writing, another tropical storm is approaching the country heading towards the same direction that Typhoon Yolanda took.

It would take more than a week to actually determine the extent of damages that Typhoon Yolanda havocked on people, infrastructure, livestock and crops. What the government and non government agencies are now struggling with are the accessibility of roads so that relief goods can reach the survivors and the medical attention to the wounded and sick. There is also a possibility of an outbreak of diseases.

Prayer and Support Needed for Haiyan Survivors

In Tacloban City after Typhoon Haiyan according to reports, survivors are resorting to violence and looting because of hunger. There are people who are losing their minds because of trauma, grief over the death of loved ones and severe hunger.

The worst affected area is Tacloban, the capital of Leyte Province which is approximately 360 miles southeast of Manila. Aside from Leyte province, other areas were affected in Iloilo, Palawan and Mindoro.

A number of officers were in the nearby island Cebu when the devastation happened. They were there for the annual Red Shield Appeal. After the storm, two men officers were able to hire a motorcycle and braved the road to go back to their families in Leyte and to coordinate the relief work with the local officials and department of social worker.

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Officers from Iloilo surveyed other affected areas such as Lemery, Roxas Capiz and Banete Iloilo. A team from the Territorial Headquarters will transport relief goods and medicines to Tacloban through the help of Philippine Airforce very shortly.

 

Prayer and Support Needed for Haiyan Survivors

We encourage prayer support for all those who have been devastated by this calamity. Click here if you would also like to give monetary support, or call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (1-800-725-2769).

International Support Boosts Philippines Typhoon Response

International Support Boosts Philippines Typhoon Response

International Support Boosts Philippines Typhoon Response
International Support Boosts Philippines Typhoon Response: In the photo: Destruction
in Leyte province caused by Typhoon Haiyan.

London, England (November 12, 2103)—As The Salvation Army in The Philippines attempts to get relief aid and personnel – including a doctor – to the areas worst-hit by Typhoon Haiyan, they will soon be joined by Damaris Frick from International Emergency Services in London. Damaris is a hugely experienced relief worker, having helped to organise Salvation Army emergency responses in Africa, South America and across Asia.

Before leaving for the airport Damaris admitted that she was expecting to face some terrible conditions. ‘Having worked in The Philippines before,’ she said, ‘we at International Emergency Services know how efficiently and well our colleagues there will have been dealing with this terrible disaster. This one, however, appears to have been even worse than those they have suffered in recent years. There are major logistical issues in getting relief items where they are most needed.’

Damaris is heading to The Philippines at the request of the local Salvation Army. Territorial Commander Colonel Wayne Maxwell explains: ‘Our challenge here is to develop and maximise local Government contacts, to facilitate the effective distribution of supplies and donated items and to effectively receive the donations that people want to make. Despite all our planning, one of our major needs is for professional emergency response expertise to help with the local structure, response and distribution.’

The Salvation Army is doing all it can to make the most of two great strengths – having people already ‘on the ground’ because they actually live and work in the affected areas, but also having an international network that can come together to bring in urgently needed funding. The Salvation Army’s Canada and Bermuda Territory, for instance, has already made available $100,000 for the relief effort. Other Salvation Army territories have launched public appeals for funds.

‘We have had good conversations with donors already,’ says Damaris, ‘and we are touched by the responses of individuals and Salvation Army territories. We are spending half our time responding to people, from major donors to individuals, who are offering help – which is wonderful!’

The most urgent need is for food, water and other essentials, but Damaris is already thinking about what comes next. ‘We will have to look at preparing for the longer term,’ she says, ‘and at opportunities to help people to return to some semblance of normality.’

Donations to support The Salvation Army’s response in The Philippines can be made online or through local Salvation Army offices.

Salvation Army ministry in The Philippines began in the 1930s. There are more than 11,000 Salvationists in the country, 177 active officers (ministers) and over 50 employees.

Salvation Army in the Philippines Prepares for 'Significant' Response to Typhoon

Salvation Army in the Philippines Prepares for ‘Significant’ Response to Typhoon

London, England (November 11, 2013) – Salvation Army teams in The Philippines are preparing to provide assistance to the thousands of people affected by Typhoon Haiyan (known locally as Typhoon Yolanda). More than 10,000 people are thought to have lost their lives in the disaster, with hundreds of thousands left without homes, power or clean water. The worst-hit areas are impossible to reach by road, and many communities have no means of making contact with the rest of the country, meaning that it is difficult to build a clear picture of exactly where the need is greatest.

Salvation Army in the Philippines Prepares for 'Significant' Response to Typhoon

Lieut-Colonel Bob Lee (Chief Secretary, The Philippines Territory) says it will take more than a week to determine the full extent of the damage that has been wreaked on people, infrastructure, livestock and crops. ‘What the government and non-governmental agencies are now struggling with,’ he says, ‘is the accessibility of roads so that relief goods can reach the survivors and the medical attention to the wounded and sick. There is also a possibility of an outbreak of disease.’

The worst-affected area seems to be around Tacloban, the capital of the island province of Leyte, which is approximately 360 miles south-east of the Filipino capital Manila. The islands of Iloilo, Palawan and Mindoro were also affected. A team from territorial headquarters is making arrangements with the Philippine Airforce to transport food parcels, water and medical supplies to Tacloban, and a Salvationist doctor will be part of the initial response team.

Territorial Commander Colonel Wayne Maxwell reports: ‘We have placed an order for US$100,000 of food supplies to assist the people of Tacloban … The reality for us here is that the need is great and we want to provide a significant response. The Island of Leyte has four corps (Salvation Army churches) and there are other islands that have experienced major levels of devastation. The task for us is immense and our cash extremely limited!’

Damaris Frick, from The Salvation Army’s International Emergency Services, is heading out to The Philippines to help with the initial response.

Lieut-Colonel Lee adds: ‘A number of officers from Leyte were on the nearby island of Cebu when the typhoon hit. After the storm, two officers were able to hire a motorcycle and braved the road to go back to their families in Leyte, where they began to coordinate the relief work with local officials.’

He concludes: ‘We encourage prayer support for all those who have been devastated by this calamity.’

The best way to help The Salvation Army serve those affected by this storm is make a monetary contribution. Give online here.